Saturday, July 12, 2014

MELINDA PILLSBURY FOSTERS LIFESTEALERS http://www.lifestealers.org/Board-of-Directors.html. ON HER WEBSITE A VERY SCARY DOCTOR, WHO WOULD EVER GET TREATMENTS BY HER IS NUTS!!In August of 2002, Dr. Leedom and her then husband, Barry Lichtenthal, (also spelled Lichenthal), whom she met through an online dating service, opened a clinic for the care and treatment of substance abuse and dependent persons called "Noah's Ark Foundation" in Bridgeport, Conn. Dr. Leedom was the medical director of the clinic. When seeking to obtain the necessary permits for the clinic, Leedom introduced her husband to licensing agents of the State of Connecticut as "Dr. Michael Taylor." She continued to maintain this fraud with staff and patients until the end

Melinda Pillsbury fosters lifestealer alright!!!!  NOAHS ARK FOUNDATION WAS A SCARY PLACE!!!!
http://www.lifestealers.org/Board-of-Directors.html


Noah's Ark Scandal


Fraudulent From the Start
In August of 2002,  Dr. Leedom and her then husband, Barry Lichtenthal, (also spelled Lichenthal), whom she met through an online dating service, opened a clinic for the care and treatment of substance abuse and dependent persons called "Noah's Ark Foundation" in Bridgeport, Conn. Dr. Leedom was the medical director of the clinic.  When seeking to obtain the necessary permits for the clinic, Leedom introduced her husband to licensing agents of the State of Connecticut as "Dr. Michael Taylor."  She continued to maintain this fraud with staff and patients until the end. 
During interviews with the State licensing agents, in the presence of his wife, Liane Leedom, Barry Lichenthal AKA Dr. Michael Taylor, claimed that he was a retired gynecologist and that he had been able to retire because of investments in telecommunications in Florida.
"Dr. Taylor" was placed in charge of the clinic while Dr. Leedom only provided occasional supervision

The Scandal Breaks

On April 12th, the story broke in the local Connecticut Post:
Caution: Fake doc can cause side effects; Former patients claim gun play, experiments
By Daniel Tepfer
Former patients complained Friday that they went to Dr. Michael Taylor expecting to find an expert to treat their drug-addiction problems. Instead of a kindly Dr. Jekyll, the patients said they were confronted by a frightening Mr. Hyde.
Several people claimed he waved a gun at them and as they waited naked for treatment conducted bizarre experiments on their bodies.
Barry Lichenthal who used the name Dr. Michael Taylor was brought into Superior Court Friday, his hands chained behind his back. Lichenthal, 58, of Old Dyke Road, Trumbull, is charged with second-degree sexual assault, fourth-degree sexual assault and practicing medicine without a license.
The portly man with thinning gray hair and large, aviator-style glasses, shifted from one foot to another as he stood before Judge Richard Damiani. "He was preying on this community's weak and less fortunate, masquerading as a trusted member of the medical community," Assistant State's Attorney Charles Stango said.  He said Lichenthal has used numerous aliases and is under a federal court order to make restitution of $600,000 for a prior mail fraud conviction.
Damiani refused to reduce the $1.75 million bond for Lichenthal, stating he had information the suspect had been planning to go to Florida. The judge sealed the warrant and continued the case to April 29. But Lichenthal's lawyer, William Dow, contended that such a large bond is usually reserved for accused multiple murderers. He said his client is the father of two children and stepfather of two others.
"Allegations don't make a case," Dow said later. "I'm anxious to learn from the state what the basis of the allegations are."
According to sources close to the investigation, Lichenthal who reportedly has no medical license and no formal medical training opened a methadone clinic last summer in the Merritt Medical Building on Main Street with his wife, Liane Leedom, a licensed psychiatrist affiliated with St. Vincent's Medical Center. They named the clinic the Noah's Ark Foundation. But soon after opening the clinic, Leedom took maternity leave, leaving her husband in charge. The sources said between 60 and 80 people a day would come to the clinic to receive methadone, a synthetic narcotic used to treat heroin addiction.
Soon, sources said, Lichenthal began to examine women who came to the clinic, performing breast and gynecological examinations on them without gloves. The sources said one woman claimed Lichenthal told her and another women to come into a room and take their clothes off. He then began attaching wires to their bodies, telling them he had to determine whether they were lesbians before he could give them methadone. After a few minutes of doing this so-called "alpha test," he proclaimed the women were "straight" and proceeded with their methadone treatment, the sources said.
Another woman said that when she questioned Lichenthal why he was massaging her breasts, he replied he was also a sex therapist and had studied at the Masters and Johnson Institute, the sources said.
Since the story of the allegations against Lichenthal appeared Friday in the Connecticut Post, several former patients have come forward to complain about his treatment of them. A 48-year-old Ansonia woman said she began going to the clinic Jan. 28 for methadone treatment. However, she said, "Dr. Taylor" told her to disrobe in an examination room and then began handling her breasts. "When I asked him why he was doing it, he said, 'Everybody who comes in gets an examination,' " she recounted. "I believed he was a doctor, so I let him do it."
Other former patients recalled that Lichenthal had waved around a handgun, telling them he was a former FBI agent who had killed people. And other patients said Lichenthal was not careful about how much methadone he dispensed, and often over-medicated them.
Apparently there were more serious problems that resulted from the Leedom-Lichenthal deception.  The Associated Press reported on 29 May, 2003:
Woman says phony doctor led to miscarriage
A Trumbull woman claims she lost her unborn child because of electric shock therapy and methadone treatments prescribed by a phony doctor. The 22-year-old woman filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Barry Lichtenthal, who is being held on criminal charges that he posed as Dr. Michael Taylor and performed gynecological exams on women in his wife's Dr. Liane Leedom.methadone clinic.
According to the court documents obtained by the Connecticut Post, the woman claims Lichtenthal told her the treatments were necessary. He allegedly told her he was a former FBI agent and would send her to jail if she didn't comply. She is suing Lichtenthal and his wife, Dr. Liane Leedom.
Lichtenthal, 58, is charged with second-degree sexual assault, fourth-degree sexual assault and practicing medicine without a license. He is being held in lieu of $1.75 million.
Leedom ran the Noah's Ark Foundation, a state-licensed methadone clinic that has since been shut down. Leedom's license is suspended. The woman says she met with Lichtenthal daily for five months. She said he told her the methadone would not harm the fetus.
Medical License Reprimanded and Restricted On 4 May 2005, apparently as part of a plea bargain,  Dr. Leedom's signed a Consent Order, agreeing that the allegations were true and her medical license was reprimanded and restricted. The restrictions include stipulations that Leedom:
  • Shall only engage in the non-clinical practice of medicine.
    * Shall not provide treatment to any person.
    * Shall not engage in any practice or administrative function that may direct, manage, supervise or dictate the course of any person's medical care or treatment.
    * Shall obtain written approval from the Department prior to any change in professional activity that utilizes, applies, or is contingent upon respondent's status as a licensed physician/surgeon.
    * Shall not hold, serve or be employed in any position as a director, supervisor or manager of any medical facility.
    * Is restricted from the supervision of physician assistants and/or establishing collaborative practice with advanced practice registered nurses.
    * Respondent shall satisfy and comply with any and all terms of her criminal probation relating to this matter. Any violation of her cirminal probation shall constitute a violation of this Consent Order.
    * In the event that Respondent violates any terms of this Consent Order, Respondent agrees to cooperate with the Department and to submit to and complete a medical, psychiatric and/or psychological evaluation.
    * Respondent agrees that this Consent Order shall be a public document.


Sociopathy Expert

Liane Leedom has parlayed this experience into a new career: online sociopathy 'expert' at LoveFraud and author claiming that her motivation is her great fear that her son, fathered by Lichenthal/Lichtenthal, may be a sociopath "Just Like His Father". Leedom's opinions and 'expertise' is often off-the mark according to accepted experts. She also offers 'advice' at Dr. Hare's support board: AFTERMATH.
Noah's Ark Scandal

Fraudulent From the Start

In August of 2002,  Dr. Leedom and her then husband, Barry Lichtenthal, (also spelled Lichenthal), whom she met through an online dating service, opened a clinic for the care and treatment of substance abuse and dependent persons called "Noah's Ark Foundation" in Bridgeport, Conn. Dr. Leedom was the medical director of the clinic.  When seeking to obtain the necessary permits for the clinic, Leedom introduced her husband to licensing agents of the State of Connecticut as "Dr. Michael Taylor."  She continued to maintain this fraud with staff and patients until the end. 
During interviews with the State licensing agents, in the presence of his wife, Liane Leedom, Barry Lichenthal AKA Dr. Michael Taylor, claimed that he was a retired gynecologist and that he had been able to retire because of investments in telecommunications in Florida.
"Dr. Taylor" was placed in charge of the clinic while Dr. Leedom only provided occasional supervision



Books 
Just Like His Father
Driven to Do Evil
Women Who Love Psychopaths (co-authored with Sandra L. Brown, M.A.) (from an Amazon.com review of WOMEN WHO LOVE PSYCHOPATHS):
...Liane Leedom also contributed, however her view of psychopathy is something more along the lines of the DSM-IV category, which anyone who studies the subject know is grossly misleading and quite inaccurate.
My biggest complaint about the book are its contributions by Liane Leedom. For example, on page 19 we're told, "ADHD is often a precursor to psychopathy." which simply isn't true. No reference is cited nor have I seen this in the classic literature (Hare, Cleckley, etc.) There was also a tendency to quote Wikipedia as if it's a reliable source. If I've learned anything about Wikipedia is that it's good for something, mundane things, like the temperature of the sun or a superficial look at history or definitions, but when it comes to sensitive topics, like... psychopathy that the information is likely to be skewed in favor of the mainstream. If you want a good example contrast these two entries on the topic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychopathy and http://enpsychopedia.org/index.php/Psychopathy.
This reviewer goes on to say the book was excellent, with the exception of Leedom's misleading information